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Final Argument in Alex Jones’ Sandy Hook Lawsuit

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WATERBURY, Conn. (AP) – A Connecticut jury is set to hear closing arguments Thursday in a trial to determine how much Infowars host Alex Jones should pay for persuading his audience that the 2012 Sandy Hook elementary school shooting was a hoax perpetrated to impose more gun control laws.

The six-person jury could begin deliberations by the end of the day in the lawsuit, one of several brought against the conspiracy theorist by people close to…

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WATERBURY, Conn. (AP) – A Connecticut jury is set to hear closing arguments Thursday in a trial to determine how much Infowars host Alex Jones should pay for persuading his audience that the 2012 Sandy Hook elementary school shooting was a hoax perpetrated to impose more gun control laws.

The six-person jury could begin deliberations by the end of the day in the trial, one of several brought against the conspiracy theorist by relatives of the 26 people killed in the mass shooting.

Since September 13, the 15 plaintiffs in the Connecticut lawsuit have testified that they were tormented for a decade by people who believed Jones’ claims that the shooting never happened and that the parents of the 20 children killed were parents. “crisis actors”.

The plaintiffs said they received death and rape threats, letters from conspiracy theorists containing photos of dead children, and face-to-face confrontations with hoax believers. They sued Jones for defamation, intentional infliction of emotional distress, and violation of Connecticut’s unfair trade practices law by profiting from the lies of the hoax.

Those suing Jones and his company, Free Speech System, in the Connecticut case include relatives of eight victims of the massacre, as well as an FBI agent who responded to the school.

Mark Barden, whose son Daniel was among the 26 victims, told the jury conspiracy theorists had threatened to dig up the boy’s grave to prove the shooting never happened.

“It’s such a sacrosanct and sacred place to my family and to hear people desecrate it, urinate on it and threaten to dig it up, I don’t know how to explain to you what that feels like,” Barden said. jury. “But that’s where we are.”

Jones, whose Infowars show and brand is based in Austin, Texas, was for defaming plaintiffs last year. In an unusual ruling, Judge Barbara Bellis found Jones lost his right to a trial due to repeated violations of court orders and failure to turn over documents to plaintiffs’ attorneys.

Jones spoke up, saying he was “done saying I’m sorry” for calling the school hoaxing.

Outside the courthouse and on his webcast, he has repeatedly denounced the lawsuit as a “kangaroo court” and an effort to bankrupt him. He invoked the right to free speech, but he and his lawyer were not allowed to make that argument at trial because he had already been convicted.

Jones’ lawyer, Norm Pattis, tried to limit the damages awarded to the families of the victims and claimed that the relatives were exaggerating their claims of harm.

In a similar trial in Texas in August, a jury ordered Jones to pay damages to the parents of one of the children killed in the shooting, based on the lies in the hoax. A third such trial, also in Texas, involving two other parents is expected to begin later this year.

Jones said he expects the cases to stall on appeal within the next two years and asked his audience to help him raise $500,000 to pay his legal fees. Free Speech Systems, meanwhile, is filing for bankruptcy protection.

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